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Seedless Raspberry Sauce

Raspberry sauce in a glass pouring cup

This Raspberry Sauce recipe is quick and easy to make with either fresh or frozen raspberries.  I like to strain out the seeds for a super smooth sauce that is perfect for spooning over vanilla ice cream, swirling into a cheesecake, and even adding to buttercream.

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Ingredients

  • 12oz (340g) raspberries, frozen with no sugar added OR 12oz (340g) raspberries, fresh
  • 2 tsp (10g) strained, freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • ⅓ – ½ cup (67-100g) granulated sugar (based on the sweetness level of the raspberries)

Equipment

Making Raspberry Sauce with Frozen Berries

Place the strainer over a bowl and completely thaw the frozen raspberries. This will take multiple hours.  When thawed, press the berries into the strainer to remove as much juice as possible.  Place the remaining pulp into a food processor or blender and puree the raspberries.  Then place the raspberry puree back into the strainer to remove all the raspberry seeds. 

Making Raspberry Sauce with Fresh Berries

Place the fresh raspberries into a food processor or blender and puree the raspberries. 

Raspberry puree in a fine mesh strainer over a saucepan

Pour the raspberry puree into a strainer over a bowl to catch all the juices.  Use a spatula to push the puree through the strainer and remove all the raspberry seeds.

Can I Make Raspberry Sauce Without a Blender or Food Processor?

You absolutely can make raspberry sauce without a blender or food processor if you would prefer to avoid using an appliance.  Use your spatula to push the raspberries against the inside of the strainer to remove the juice and pulp from the seeds.  If you use this process, be aware that it takes longer than using a blender or food processor because the fruit clings to the seeds. 

Do You Have to Remove Seeds From Raspberry Puree

Removing seeds from raspberry sauce is really a personal preference.  There are some applications where seeds are less noticeable (e.g., in a raspberry crisp/crumble), but frequently, the seeds add an unpleasant textural element to the dessert and have a tendency to get stuck in your teeth.  I personally prefer straining raspberry sauce, but if you would prefer to keep the raspberry seeds, just skip the straining step.   

Cooking the Raspberry Sauce

If you would like a thin sauce, you can use it immediately. 

Reducing raspberry sauce in a saucepan

If you would prefer a thicker raspberry sauce (e.g., if you need to add it to buttercream), place the raspberry puree into a saucepan over medium heat and reduce to approximately 1½ liquid cups or until you reach the nappe stage (i.e., when the sauce is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon).  This should take approximately 5-10 minutes.

Adding sugar and lemon juice to raspberry sauce

Remove from the heat and stir in the lemon juice and sugar.  Continue stirring until the sugar completely dissolves.  Refrigerate the raspberry sauce for a minimum of one hour before using.  This will help it thicken slightly. 

Serving the Raspberry Sauce

Raspberry sauce falling off spoon into glass cup

Remove the sauce from the refrigerator and spoon over desserts (e.g., as a topping for vanilla ice cream) or add to a recipe to add a raspberry flavor (e.g., Raspberry Buttercream or Raspberry Cream Cheese Filling). 

Storing Raspberry Sauce

Store the raspberry sauce in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.  It can also be stored in the freezer for up to 3 months. 

Raspberry sauce in a glass pouring cup

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Raspberry Sauce

Prep Time2 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Thawing Time (if using frozen raspberries)2 hrs
Course: Dessert
Servings: 1.5 cups

Equipment

  • Digital scale (or dry measuring cup and measuring spoons)
  • Lemon squeezer
  • Large fine mesh strainer
  • Large bowl
  • Blender/Food processor (optional)
  • Silicone spatula
  • Small saucepan

Ingredients

  • 12 oz (340g) raspberries, frozen with no sugar added OR 12oz (340g) raspberries, fresh
  • 2 tsp (10g) strained, freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • ⅓ – ½ cup (67-100g) granulated sugar (based on the sweetness level of the raspberries)

Instructions

Making Raspberry Sauce with Frozen Berries

  • Place the strainer over a bowl and completely thaw the frozen raspberries. This will take multiple hours. When thawed, press the berries into the strainer to remove as much juice as possible. Place the remaining pulp into a food processor or blender and puree the raspberries. Then place the raspberry puree back into the strainer to remove all the raspberry seeds.

Making Raspberry Sauce with Fresh Berries

  • Place the fresh raspberries into a food processor or blender and puree the raspberries. Pour the raspberry puree into a strainer over a bowl to catch all the juices. Use a spatula to push the puree through the strainer and remove all the raspberry seeds.

Can I Make Raspberry Sauce Without a Blender or Food Processor?

  • You absolutely can make raspberry sauce without a blender or food processor if you would prefer to avoid using an appliance. Use your spatula to push the raspberries against the inside of the strainer to remove the juice and pulp from the seeds. If you use this process, be aware that it takes longer than using a blender or food processor because the fruit clings to the seeds.

Do You Have to Remove Seeds From Raspberry Sauce

  • Removing seeds from raspberry sauce is really a personal preference. There are some applications where seeds are less noticeable (e.g., in a raspberry crisp/crumble), but frequently, the seeds add an unpleasant textural element to the dessert and have a tendency to get stuck in your teeth. I personally prefer straining raspberry sauce, but if you would prefer to keep the raspberry seeds, just skip the straining step.

Cooking the Raspberry Sauce

  • If you would like a thin raspberry sauce, you can use the sauce immediately.
  • If you would prefer a thicker raspberry sauce (e.g., if you need to add it to buttercream), place the raspberry puree into a saucepan over medium heat and reduce to approximately 1½ liquid cups or until you reach the nappe stage (i.e., when the sauce is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon). This should take approximately 5-10 minutes.
  • Remove from the heat and stir in the lemon juice and sugar. Continue stirring until the sugar completely dissolves. Refrigerate the raspberry sauce for a minimum of one hour before using. This will help it thicken slightly.

Serving the Raspberry Sauce

  • Remove the sauce from the refrigerator and spoon over desserts (e.g., as a topping for vanilla ice cream) or add to a recipe to add a raspberry flavor (e.g., Raspberry Buttercream or Raspberry Cream Cheese Filling).

Storing Raspberry Sauce

  • Store the raspberry sauce in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. It can also be stored in the freezer for up to 3 months.

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